The Mission

Worldcrunch delivers the best global journalism previously shut off from English language readers: selecting, translating and editing content from top foreign-language outlets.

The Method

The most relevant foreign-language stories are produced in English by Worldcrunch staff and contributors around the globe, deployed to react quickly to breaking events and find the best content in the international media. We are also creating a platform, Crunch It!, to build a community of newshounds who will flag and help translate interesting stories from both mainstream media outlets and blogs, as well as produce stories of their own.

The Vision

With Worldcrunch, the great untapped resource of foreign-language news and information is hereby available. By combining professional journalistic standards with the energy of the web's flock of curious readers, writers and translators -- and building a framework for copyright access and distribution -- we create a whole new well of top-shelf news content from the best sources covering the world today. And our vision for the future? Worldcrunch will be the virtual square where language barriers fade, and a new brand of global journalism is born.

The Team

The Buzz

Spreading the News in Europe, in English

nytimes.com | May 8, 2011

As news organizations around the world shut down foreign bureaus, journalists, entrepreneurs and even government bodies in Europe are creating new news ventures to try to fill the void.
As a result, readers seeking international news are increasingly spoiled for choice — especially if they read English, the common second language of many Europeans and the favored tongue for many of the new outlets... Read all

News translation service Worldcrunch chalks up first distribution deal

journalism.co.uk | April 12, 2011

News translation platform Worldcrunch has announced its first distribution deal this week, in a new partnership with Time.com.
Worldcrunch, which went live in December last year, was set up by former bureau chief for Time magazine Jeff Israely and former CEO of Ask.com France Irene Toporkoff... Read all

How can news sites cross the language barrier and appeal to foreign readers?

thenextweb.com | March 2, 2011

Americans and Brits who are hungry for foreign news can find a quick overview without having to engage in the heavy lifting that would be required in order to navigate through every non-English news site. The Economist can maintain its news scarcity... Read all

Media Pros Unleashed: Disruption Drives Innovation

mediapost.com | January 7, 2011

In January 1986, the space shuttle Challenger exploded 73 seconds into its flight. It was about 11:30 in the morning, and I was a reporter at a daily newspaper in New Jersey. The time of day was significant because it meant that if we hustled, we could get the story into the afternoon edition of the paper.The editor actually... Read all

Online Journalism News

journalism.co.uk | November 19, 2010

A former bureau chief for Time magazine and former CEO of Ask.com France have co-founded a site which aims to offer journalists and the public translated news from non-English media... Read all

WorldCrunch: making global news accessible

editorsweblog.org | November 18, 2010

All news can be global and local, declares the website of new start-up WorldCrunch, whose mission is to provide English translations of news articles from around the world. "What we're looking for is to provide a global view of the world," co-founder Jeff Israely told the Editors Weblog... Read all

New international news project: WorldCrunch

ejc.net | November 11, 2010

Former Time magazine bureau chief in Europe Jeff Israely has announced his new international news project, WorldCrunch, on Nieman Lab. WorldCrunch, inspired by France's Courrier International among others, will collect and translated news content from around the world... Read all

Jeff Israely: An idea and a brand come together as Worldcrunch

niemanlab.org | November 10, 2010

This is a long overdue introduction: a kind of public christening, a chance to share with you, the reader, our vision for the future of news. Okay, you see... Read all