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Worldcrunch

The World's Creepiest Holiday Destinations

For most vacationers this summer, it was a choice of beach, countryside or cultural capitals. Of course the world is also full of places where most people would never consider spending a holiday. But leave it to the tourism industry to cash in on the strange and creepy too. Take a look.

"Sailing stones" in Death Valley, California - Photo: mikebaird

1. Breakwater Lodge, A 19th-Century Prison Hotel

US Flag

SOUTH AFRICA

2013-08-08 Read Later
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Breakwater Lodge in Cape Town, South Africa, was built as a prison in 1859 to exile British convicts as far from home as possible. Today, it is a hotel situated at the foot of Table Mountain and overlooking a beautiful bay where visitors can stay in old cells amid the ghosts of ancient prisoners. Breakwater prison was the first to racially segregate black and white convicts, and the remains of a treadmill on which prisoners were punished is still there today.

Breakwater Lodge, Cape Town - Photo: Wikimedia Commons


Crunched By: Patrick Randall

2. The Door To Hell

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TURKMENISTAN

2013-08-07 Read Later
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In 1971, Soviet petrochemical scientists started drilling into the soil in Turkmenistan’s Karakum Desert when the ground collapsed causing their drilling rig to fall into a 300-foot-wide cavern filled with natural gas. To try to eliminate the methane gas in the hole, they decided to light it, thinking it would burn within a few days. But more than 40 years later, the cavern is still burning and is characterized by locals as the “Door to Hell.” For visitors who can bear the smell of pungent sulfur, you can camp in yurts nearby, listening to scary fireside stories told by locals.

The Door to Hell, Karakum Desert - Photo: Wikimedia Commons


Crunched By: Patrick Randall

3. The Hotel of Doom

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NORTH KOREA

2013-08-07 Read Later
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Who hasn’t dreamed of a relaxing sojourn in North Korea, where you could enjoy sleeping in the world’s most poorly designed titanic hotel? Once designed to be the tallest hotel in the world, construction of the Ryugyong Hotel began in the city of Pyongyang in 1987 but was abandoned in 1992 amid North Korea’s economic crisis and the collapse of the Soviet Union. For 16 years, the 105-story pyramid-shaped building was windowless and without any interior build out. Its construction resumed in 2008, and its exterior was reportedly complete in 2012. The “Hotel of Doom,” as it is nicknamed, has 3,000 rooms and was supposed to be ready to receive customers in mid-2013. But diplomatic tensions between the U.S. and South Korea have stalled its opening once again.

Doom Hotel, Pyongyang - Photo: Wikimedia Commons


Crunched By: Patrick Randall

4. Suicide Forest

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JAPAN

2013-08-07 Read Later
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Aokigahara is a 34-square-mile Japanese forest at the northwest base of Mount Fuji. It is sadly nicknamed “Suicide Forest” because of the frequent incidences of suicides there. Until 1988, there were some 100 suicides every year. Although the government placed signs in the forest urging despairing visitors to turn back and seek help, the deaths persisted. In 2010, there were 247 attempted suicides, and 54 of them succeeded. Aokigahara is known for being exceptionally quiet because of the wind-blocking density of trees and lack of wildlife, and it is also reputedly haunted by the angry spririts of the dead. For those who dig sinister places, tours around Mount Fuji and Suicide Forest start from only 130€.

Aokigahara Forest - Photo: Simon


Crunched By: Patrick Randall

5. Snake Island

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BRAZIL

2013-08-07 Read Later
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Ilha de Queimada Grande, also known as Snake Island, off the Brazilian coast of São Paulo, is a 110-acre island and home to one of the most venimous species of snakes in the world — the Golden Lancehead Viper. Researchers say that there are between one and five snakes on every square meter of the island. The Golden Lanceheads grow to well over half a meter long, and theirs is a powerful fast-acting poison that melts the flesh around their bites. They are so dangerous that the Brazilian Navy has expressly forbidden anyone, with the exception of some scientists, from landing on the island. So if you were thinking of spending your next holiday communing here with deadly snakes, you better get on that science degree first. Or buy an invisible boat.

Snake Island - Photo: Prefeitura Municipal de Itanhaém


Crunched By: Patrick Randall

6. The Boneyard

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UNITED STATES

2013-08-07 Read Later
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The 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG), known more commonly as The Boneyard, is a 4-square-mile site in Arizona that is home 4,000 retired U.S. armed forces aircrafts. Tucson's Pima Air & Space Museum offers tours at the Air Force base to see retired American military aircraft. Some of the planes are as many as 60 years old.

A retired CV240 in The Boneyard - Photo: Wikimedia Commons


Crunched By: Patrick Randall

7. Chernobyl

US Flag

UKRAINE

2013-08-07 Read Later
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Chernobyl Tour, the official provider of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, offers several types of tours of the abandoned city. Nearly 30 years after the Ukrainian nuclear power plant explosion, Chernobyl and its neighboring town, Pripyat, are desolate and weedy. But both towns still hold signs of the past and the people who lived here: abandoned schools, shops, houses and appartments are some of the strange places tourists visit in this unique area, fenced off from the rest of the world.

Abandonned bumper cars in Pripyat - Photo: Wikimedia Commons


Crunched By: Patrick Randall
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