Close

Forgot your password?

Choose a newsletter




Premium access provided by ENSTA

Your premium access provided by ENSTA

Enter your email to begin

Premium access granted to you by NRC Q

You been given free premium access to Worldcrunch for 8 weeks thanks to NRC Q.

Enter your email to begin

Premium access granted to you by EM-LYON

You been given free premium access to Worldcrunch for 8 weeks thanks to EM-LYON.

Enter your email to begin

Premium access granted to you by Goldsmiths

You been given free premium access to Worldcrunch for 8 weeks thanks to Goldsmiths.

Enter your email to begin

Premium access granted to you by MinnPost

You been given free premium access to Worldcrunch for 6 months thanks to MinnPost.

Enter your email to begin

Premium access granted to you by Expatica

You've been given FREE premium access to Worldcrunch

Enter your email to begin

Worldcrunch

More Central American Migrants Than Ever Crossing Into Mexico

DIARIO DEL SUR (Mexico)

ARRIAGA – The impoverished Mexican state of Chiapas couldn’t be less hospitable to the many Central American migrants who cross over from Guatemala in search of better opportunities up north.

In the border town of Arriaga, criminals prey on the new arrivals, as do coyotes (people smugglers) and even local authorities, who harass and exploit them, Diario del Sur reports. Most of the migrants sleep outdoors, on sidewalks or benches, since the only shelter – the Church-run “Home of Mercy” – is full beyond capacity.

And yet these Central Americans, who arrive in some cases after walking hundreds of miles, keep crossing over. Not only that, but their numbers appear to be rising significantly. “Yes, the flow of migrants has increased,” says Heyman Vázquez Medina, a Catholic priest who runs the Home or Mercy. “There are twice as many now. Before, 30, sometimes 40 migrants would arrive each day. Now we receive 80 or more migrants… they say there’s no work in their countries.”

Many of the newcomers are children or adolescents. Vázquez suspects some are on the run from the maras, violent street gangs that operate in places like Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. 

Read the full story in Spanish



Sign up for our weekly Global Life newsletter now


Be a part of the conversation. Click to show comments
About this article source Website:

Load More Stories

Unlimited access to exclusive journalism, the best world news source across all your devices

Subscribe Now Photo of Worldcrunch on different devices

Your premium access to Worldcrunch is provided by

University of Central Lancashire

Please register to begin


By registering you agree to our terms of service and privacy policy.